Why It Is Not 'Narrow-Minded' to Believe in Jesus, Teachings About Truth (Favorite Sermon Notes - Part 1)

This is part 1 of a series called "Favorite Sermon Notes" that shares notes from my favorite sermons or writings. This article draws from the writings and sermons of Timothy Keller, the pastor who founded the Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City, New York. He is also the author of The New York Times bestselling books "The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism," "The Prodigal God," and "Prayer."

If you've been a Christian long enough, you've heard the creed of post-modernism: "You can't believe Jesus' claims that He is the only road to God. That's narrow-minded. And besides, there's no such thing as absolute truth. All truth is relative."

I appreciate Timothy Keller. I'm thankful for his presence in our country and the difference he has made. He is the pastor who founded the Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City, New York. He is also the author of The New York Times bestselling books "The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism," "The Prodigal God," and "Prayer."

Here's a small excerpt to his "The Reason for God" book, which, among, other things, provides a thorough refutation of the post-modern relativist claim:

By now the fatal flaw in this approach to religion in general and to Christianity in particular should be obvious. Skeptics believe that any exclusive claims to a superior knowledge of spiritual reality cannot be true. But this objection is itself a religious belief. It assumes God is unknowable, or that God is loving but not wrathful, or that God is an impersonal force rather than a person who speaks in Scripture. All of these are unprovable faith assumptions. In addition, their proponents believe they have a superior way to view things. They believe the world would be a better place if everyone dropped the traditional religions’ views of God and truth and adopted theirs. Therefore, their view is also an “exclusive” claim about the nature of spiritual reality. If all such views are to be discouraged, this one should be as well. If it is not narrow to hold this view, then there is nothing inherently narrow about holding to traditional religious beliefs (Keller, Timothy (2008-02-14). The Reason for God (p. 10). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition).

What's the simplest way to summarize this?

There is no such thing as a "non-exclusive" claim about truth and religion. Some relativists do not believe that the God of the Bible exists.

The God of the Bible does not believe that relativists exist.

A person's assumption that he or she maintains a non-exclusive worldview is a product of the modern imagination, not logic.