'The BFG' Film Review & Roald Dahl's Secret Meaning Behind 'The BFG' That Will Move You to Tears

[Parent's Content Advisory at bottom of review. Also, a big hat tip to Edwin Turner and his brilliant blog article "The BFG, Roald Dahl's love letter to his lost child," which I feature heavily in this review and will link to at the end. It is a must-read after you finish this film review.]

"Dreams are so quick," says Sophie.

"Dreams is quick on the outside, but they're long on the inside," says the Big Friendly Giant in reply.

The BFG, based on the book by Roald Dahl, is Steven Spielberg's 31st feature-length film, if you can believe it. And he has not lost his touch. In fact, his craft just keeps getting better with time. "The BFG" goes by quickly because it's so engaging, like a riveting dream that you don't want to end, and it stays with you long after the credits roll. It has density and layers to it. It's quick, under two hours, but like the dreams that the BFG catches, it's long on the inside. There's more meaning and emotional depth to it--startling in its personal intensity--than moviegoers could possibly imagine (and I'll get to that in the second half of the review.) Besides the film's surprising depth and its secret contemplation of grief, "The BFG" also has one of the most delightful third acts and finales to a film that I've seen in a long time. And that's where we'll start...

Click here to read the rest of this article on RockinGodsHouse.com where I originally posted it...